Thursday, July 15, 2010

The Pearly Gates

On the way home one afternoon, I spotted a seasonal greenhouse alongside the road proclaiming a sale on perennials.  I stopped in to buy some day lilies and some chicks n' hens.  The purveyor was a grizzly, past-middle age man with an unkempt beard and long hair. Quite honestly, he looked like the hippie that time forgot.  But he was pleasant as all get-out and knowledgeable about plants, to boot.  We got to talking as I looked over his plants and he continued to give them a long drink on this hot summer day.  I asked him what he did with his time during the rest of the year and he told me that he spent his winters in Thailand, building Orgonite towers and introducing them into the canals and other bodies of water.

Now, I don't know a thing about orgonite or its proported powers, so if you're curious about it, check out some information here. What I do know is that the friendly old hippie dude at the greenhouse believes this material and these towers are essential to help "cleanse" the earth, bring balance back to nature and that his plan is to introduce ten thousand-plus of these towers into the water in Thailand and other places around the world this year, and thousands upon thousands more each season for as long as he remains upright and breathing.

He genuinely believes that his efforts are going to help save the earth.

I'm not going to judge him or his work. Nor am I going to say that I believe in the powers of this material called orgonite or whether I think it is, as Sheldon Cooper might say, nothing but hokum.

But it did get me to thinking about a person's "life's work". I'd certainly like to reach my inevitable and (hopefully natural) end, knowing that what I largely spent my time and energies on in my days on earth was worthwhile. Meaningful. Maybe even helpful to humankind and the planet we call home.

I do wonder, though. When the green-thumbed hippie gets to whatever his version of the Pearly gates is, will someone tell him that all the metal shavings and plasticine he dumped into the rivers and oceans really helped us all? Or was it a complete waste and he should have done something else with all the time and talent he was given?

3 comments:

  1. I do not know why but this post made laugh. Anyway, at least the gentleman is doing something that he feels passionate about and truly believes that will help. The one and only thing we can do it is to contribute to making this planet better or at least not to keep on with the destruction and that is exactly what he is trying to do. Who knows? maybe he will find out in the afterlife that his efforts worked and were appreciated. :)

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  2. I guess what it comes down to is you have to decide what's worth spending your time on; to you. Everyone has a different idea of what matters. Maybe what that guy does doesn't matter to others, but it matters to him. So, he's making a difference in his way. I like this. I often see what someone is doing and shake my head. But, I have to remember it's my perspective only. It's too easy to judge others based on our own perceptions and experiences. That's why keeping an open mind is so important. Thanks for the reminder.

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  3. Hey Elisa and Brenda! Thanks for your comments.

    I'd hoped it was a funny share and, while I tease about the plastic towers and whether they do anything, I don't mean to make light of this man's efforts or criticize the fact that he *intends* to make the world a better place. He wants to fix it in his own special way. So, you both are right. Elisa, it may be scientifically valid. It might even be spiritually valid; I'm open to that too. And Brenda, even if it doesn't fix anything, maybe it fixes something in him. Sometimes I think just the effort one makes to do something, *anything*, is energy enough to bring positivity to the world. In that way, it might make all the difference.

    The greenhouse guy sure is pleasant if a bit eccentric. I've bought a few plants from him over the years and he's very concerned that the plastic 'loaner' trays come back to his greenhouse. He looks at you right in the eye, I guess to size up your character and ascertain whether you will honestly return with the empty trays once you've gotten your bedding plants delivered home safely. The pots, though, he doesn't much care because he can't reuse them himself. "You don't want these?" I asked. "Nah, I don't get money for 'em. Chuck 'em!"

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